For first time ever, x-ray imaging captures material defect process

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For centuries, humans have been changing the properties of materials to build better tools. In modern life, new materials are created to improve today’s items, such as stronger steel for skyscrapers.

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a new approach to detail the formation of these material changes at the atomic scale and in near-real time. This is an important step that could assist in engineering better and stronger new materials.

For the first time every, they have used x-rays to capture images of the creation of structural defects in palladium when the metal is exposed to hydrogen.

This imaging capability will help researchers validate models that predict the behavior of materials and how they form defects. Defect engineering is the practice of intentionally creating defects within a material in order to change the material’s properties. This knowledge is key to engineering better, stronger and more reliable materials for buildings, semiconductors, batteries, technological devices and many other items and tools.

 

Read the full article from ScienceDaily.

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